Facts and Figures

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Budget Summary - 2020

In his first Budget the Chancellor, Rishi Sunak announced a total package of fresh spending for 2020/21 of £30 billion, of which £12 billion was directly attributed to countering the impact of coronavirus on the UK economy and NHS finances. Key tax changes include the reduction of entrepreneurs’ relief to £1 million of gains and changes to the taper of the pension annual allowance.

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Spring Statement 2019

The Chancellor found himself presenting his second Spring Statement sandwiched between a series of crucial Brexit votes. The Spring Statement had no new tax proposals and indeed deferred any extension of Making Tax Digital (MTD). However, the Chancellor did introduce various consultations, early-stage discussion papers and calls for evidence across a wide range of topics.

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Intestacy rules

A high-level overview of the rules in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland governing the estates of those who die without leaving a valid will.

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Social security benefit rates

The DWP began rolling out universal credit to claimants within certain areas of the North-West of England from April 2013. Claims for existing benefits and credits will be gradually phased out and Existing claimants will move onto universal credit in line with a phased approach that is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

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Tax tables

The main rates of taxation in the UK for the 2019/20 and 2020/21 tax years.

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Tax calendar 2018/19

All of the most important dates on the tax calendar for 2018/19.

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Tax tips

Taxes, as we know, are one of the two great inevitables in life, but you can manage your financial affairs to minimise the impact of tax for you, your family and your business. In fact, the Government actually encourages you to make the most of the reliefs and allowances available. These Tax Tips show you how.

The value of tax reliefs depends on your individual circumstances. Tax laws can change. The Financial Conduct Authority does not regulate tax advice, so it is outside the investment protection rules of the Financial Services and Markets Act and the Financial Services Compensation Scheme. The value of your investment, and the income from them, may fall as well as rise, and you may not recover the full value of your investments. Changes in rates of exchange may cause the value of investments that involve exposure to a foreign currency to go up or down. The FCA does not regulate will writing and some forms of estate planning.